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Shark Cage Diving

7 June 2011

sunny 60 °F

White Shark Project

White Shark Project


SHARK DIVE DAY!!!!! We chose White Shark Project because I had picked up a flyer at the Berlin Travel Expo. They picked us and 4 other people us from Cape Town and drove us the 2 hours to Gansbaai.
Gansbaai

Gansbaai


The location is famous for the Shark Alley between Dyers Island and another rock. These are the home for thousands of fur seals which are perfect food for the sharks.
After a breakfast and video we finally get on the boat for a 20 minute ride to the site. There are other boats in the area so we get our hopes up.
making chum

making chum


To get the sharks to come they make a mix of fish parts and sea water called chum.
They also use a tuna fish head which the guy throws in the water over and over as bait.
Bait with tuna fish head

Bait with tuna fish head


It takes a bit of time but eventually 2 sharks arrive and they put five of us in the cage.
Drivers before dive

Drivers before dive


The water is absolutely frigid and the two sharks seem to disappear.
cage (2)

cage (2)


We get a few distant sightings but more of less just shiver until they tell us we are going to get out and move closer to the other boat which has sharks hanging around.
hitting the cage

hitting the cage


We get back in 10 minutes later and get the thrill of a lifetime. The sharks come so close that one bangs his tail on the cage several times. All this time your head is out of water until the people on the boat tell you a shark is coming. Then you get a deep breath and go under to try to see it. IT is hard to hold your breath too long with the water being so cold.
going under the boat

going under the boat


Eventually we switch, 5 more get in the cage and we get cameras for pictures.
the beady eye

the beady eye


At one point their were four sharks gathering around.
At the end we get snacks again and they ask us please to educate people on sharks. Apparently they are becoming endangered. A shark jaw goes for $100,000 and then there is shark soup. They are catching the larger sharks at more than 5 meters. Unfortunately sharks can’t breed until males are 3.8 m and females 4.8. So if they are killing all the large sharks they are taking out the breeders. The ones we were seeing were juveniles at about 3 m.
So here are some interesting facts from their brochure:
best breech photo I got

best breech photo I got


The densest known population is Dyer Island, South Africa - right where we are. This is also the only place in the world they are known to breech.
breeching

breeching


They have the longest recorded migratory range of any marine creature. Nicole, a female great white, was recently tracked to Australia and back. She covered a staggering 22,000 km from Dyer Island to western Australia and back in just under 9 months.
hungry shark

hungry shark


They take their pick of the marine buffet, choosing large bony fish, smaller sharks and turtles, dolphins and seals – or even the blubber of dead whales.
anybody seen a dentist

anybody seen a dentist


They can go for weeks between meals. With one bite, great whites can gobble 14 kg of flesh and they can gorge on several hundred kilograms of food.
head on collision with cage

head on collision with cage


No one really knows how long great whites live. It’s hard to find out because they lead lonely lives and are so migratory.
mosaic shark

mosaic shark


Great whites have a mega sense of smell and an amazing ability to sense the electrical fields that radiate from living creatures.
skimming the water

skimming the water


These signals are sent to the brain and are read by the great white who decides who’s swimming normally, who’s panicking, or who is wounded. Weak animals are easy prey.
full body shot

full body shot


Females are usually bigger than males. They are ovoviviparous. That means the eggs grow inside the female, hatch there and carry on growing until they are born. They give birth to between 4 and 14 pups and may have 4-6 litters in a lifetime.
swimming toward cage

swimming toward cage


White sharks store extra fat in two large livers and draw on these stores when times are hard. The livers also help to keep the shark buoyant.
Jaws fin

Jaws fin


The dorsal fin is as individual as a fingerprint – the trailing edge and the arrangement of notches in the fin is unique to each shark.
stink eye

stink eye

Posted by ErinDriver 08:21 Archived in South Africa

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